Daylights Savings Time Facts

Daylights Savings Time

There's a spike in heart attacks during the first week of Daylight Saving Time, according to a study published in 2008.

People are safer drivers during daylight hours, and researchers have found that Daylight Saving Time reduces lethal car crashes and pedestrian strikes.

Two states — Arizona and Hawaii — and four U.S. territories — American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands — don't observe Daylight Saving Time. Indiana adopted Daylight Saving Time in 2006.

Daylight Saving Time was first used during World War I, as part of an effort in the United States and other warring countries to conserve fuel. In theory, using daylight more efficiently saves fuel and energy because it reduces the nation's need for artificial light.

The first American to advocate for daylight saving was Benjamin Franklin. He realized in 1784 that many people burned candles at night yet slept past dawn in the summer, wasting early-morning sunlight.

 

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